Monthly Archives: January, 2012

Narborough

Below the Spelman window on the north side of the chancel a stone tablet has been set into the wall, bearing an old brass, which used to be on a marble monument at the east end of the north aisle. The stone has two small crosses on the left side, and it is thought to …

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Langford

Farrer describes “a fine monument” in the church, covered up with a view to restoration. In the booklet “Sculptured monuments in Norfolk Churches”, Noel Spencer2 describes it as “A mighty monument in a little church…” and it is of Sir Nicholas Garrard, died 1727, a salter (or manufacturer or dealer in salt or other chemicals3), …

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Hilborough

30.01.2012   The Caileys held this lordship from Earl Warren until the early fourteenth century when Sir Thomas Cailey left it to his heir Adam, son of Sir Roger Clifton. Above the west door are the arms of the founder, Sir John Clifton, magnificently carved, the shield bearing Warenne’s arms which his dependant lord assumed, …

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Didlington

On the north wall of the tower in an arch are six brass plates, each about 4¼ by 7 inches, remembering the Tyssen – Amherst family members. William Amhurst Tyssen Amherst was the first Baron Amherst, created 1892. He seems to have changed his surname twice, first from Daniel-Tyssen then to Tyssen-Amherst by royal licence …

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Letheringsett

Herbert Arthur Cozens-Hardy was the fourth Baron Cozens-Hardy, also living at Letheringsett Hall.. He was appointed OBE, and was a JP; Deputy Lieutenant for the County Palatine of Lancaster; and he had the unusual title of Bailif of Egle in the Order of St. John. He was born 8 June 1907, and died unmarried on 11 …

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Briningham

Briningham church is hidden away, a quiet unassuming small church, the family church of the Breretons. It has little of interest except for a memorial tucked away behind the east end in the ‘dormitory’. There are a number of broken, sunken, and neglected graves at the foot of the east wall, with no obvious names, …

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Baconsthorpe

The Heydon family came from a town of the same name; Thomas de Heydon was an itinerant justice in 1221; the law continued to be a major family occupation. In 1431, John Heydon of Baconsthorpe was made Recorder of Norwich, and was a feoffee (a trustee or legal manager of an estate owned by others) …

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Heydon Monument

An elegant monument at the east end of the south aisle, with the figures of Sir William Heydon in full armour, spurred but without helmet or sword, and behind him, his wife with head-dress and large ruff; they are kneeling on decorated cushions coloured pink above and green below. The arches of pink marble are …

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Ashill

This small village has a remarkable piece of history, dating back to Henry I’s coronation on the 6August, 1100, when William Hastyngs held the manor by grand serjeanty, as Steward to the King.  The Oxford English Dictionary quotes Sir H. Finch in 1636:  “Every grand Serjeanty is a tenure in chiefe, being of none but …

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Castle Acre

CASTLE ACRE PRIORY This was founded by William de Warenne, the first Earl of Surrey, to whom William the Conqueror gave the Lordship of this town, along with some 141 other lordships inNorfolk.  It was a cell of the St Cluniac monastery ofLewes,Sussex, which was also founded by Earl Warenne.  Castle Acre Priory was dedicated …

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